eWestern Birds

The Quarterly Journal of Western Field Ornithologists

Vol. 51, No. 4
December 2020
Western Field Ornithologists

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Contents
MAIN ARTICLES

Distribution and Abundance of Double-crested Cormorants
Nesting in the Interior of California, 2009–2012
W. David Shuford, Kathy C. Molina, John P. Kelly, T. Emiko Condeso,
Daniel S. Cooper, and Dennis Jongsomjit

Comparison of the Songs of Cassin’s and Plumbeous Vireos
Edward R. Pandolfino and Chris Ray

Nesting Biology of Urban Cooper’s Hawks in Alameda County, California
Ralph V. Pericoli, Emma L. Karsten, Allen M. Fish,
and Christopher W. Briggs

NOTES

First Evidence of Breeding of the Red-necked Grebe in California
Kenneth P. Able

Apparent Use of a Rock Crevice as a Nocturnal Roost by a Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Emilie Strauss and David L. Swanson

Unusual Record of Bonaparte’s Gull in the Sierra San Pedro Mártir, Baja California
Gorgonio Ruiz-Campos, Gonzalo de León-Girón, Hiram Rafael Moreno-Higareda, and Armando Jesús Contreras-Balderas

Book Reviews
Clayton Anderson and David Koeppel

Featured Photo: Sanderling Scavenging Crab Fragments from a Foraging Western Gull
Floyd E. Hayes and Vivek Khanzode

Thanks to Western Birds’ Reviewers and Associate Editors

Index
Daniel D. Gibson

Front cover photo by © W. D. Shuford of Petaluma, California: Aerial view of the Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) colony at Mullet Island, Salton Sea, 15 February 2012. Though the largest inland cormorant colony in California from 1997 to 1999 and 2009 to 2013, reaching 6594 nests in 2012, it has been abandoned since 2014, as the falling level of the Salton Sea joined the island to the mainland.

Back cover “Featured Photos” by © Vivek Khanzode of Sunnyvale, California: a Sanderling (Calidris alba) watching a Western Gull (Larus occidentalis) eating its fill of a crab (Pugettia producta), then scavenging the remains after the gull abandoned them—the first evidence of a Sanderling aware that it can capitalize on a predator’s behavior.